Why it is harder for Indians to diet

Even though we all understand the importance and implications of a healthy diet, it is something that always evades us. Junk food seems to trigger our pleasure centers in a way that fruits and veggies cannot, and because of that it becomes increasingly difficult to resist the urge to indulge in a burger or a slice of pizza. While dieting is no easy task in general, Indians seem especially vulnerable to fall in the clutches of unhealthy food, and here is why.

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02/5The concept of ‘eat well’

We’ve always heard from our parents and grandmas, ‘ache se khaana’. While it is true that we must eat well, eating well is often confused with eating right, and in the pursuit of eating well we end up eating the wrong food. Afterall, you can fill your stomach even with junk food. Thus, Indians end up compromising on quality over quantity.

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03/5Home food

While it is widely acknowledged that most unhealthy food is made in restaurants, Indians are misguided when it comes to the concept of ghar ka khaana. Avoiding eating at restaurants is not the only sure-fire way to avoid junk food, for equally unhealthy food can be consumed at home. Think fried snacks, white bread, jams and sandwich spreads, they are all equally unhealthy. Eating at home does not automatically translate to healthy food.

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04/5The definition of healthy

Ghar ka khaana brings us to the next point. Most Indians find it hard to diet because of the interpretation of the word healthy. For example, eating a huge meal of fried and processed food and then compensating by skipping the next meal is not considered healthy. Similarly, not every food prepared at home is healthy. Healthy food in the broadest sense refers to food that provides you with nutrition and energy at the cost of minimal ill effects. Therefore not everything prepared at home is necessarily healthy.

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05/5Work life

India does not boast of a comfortable work-life balance. Having to work overtime or six or even seven days a week not only leaves no time for a proper diet, but it also strips you of willpower. Long hours of strenuous work makes you exhausted and hungry, which most people choose to curb with unhealthy food.

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TIMESOFINDIA.COM | Last updated on – Nov 19, 2019, 08:00 ISTShare
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01/5Resisting the temptation

image

Resisting the temptation

Even though we all understand the importance and implications of a healthy diet, it is something that always evades us. Junk food seems to trigger our pleasure centers in a way that fruits and veggies cannot, and because of that it becomes increasingly difficult to resist the urge to indulge in a burger or a slice of pizza. While dieting is no easy task in general, Indians seem especially vulnerable to fall in the clutches of unhealthy food, and here is why.

02/5The concept of ‘eat well’

image

The concept of 'eat well'

We’ve always heard from our parents and grandmas, ‘ache se khaana’. While it is true that we must eat well, eating well is often confused with eating right, and in the pursuit of eating well we end up eating the wrong food. Afterall, you can fill your stomach even with junk food. Thus, Indians end up compromising on quality over quantity.

03/5Home food

image

Home food

While it is widely acknowledged that most unhealthy food is made in restaurants, Indians are misguided when it comes to the concept of ghar ka khaana. Avoiding eating at restaurants is not the only sure-fire way to avoid junk food, for equally unhealthy food can be consumed at home. Think fried snacks, white bread, jams and sandwich spreads, they are all equally unhealthy. Eating at home does not automatically translate to healthy food.

04/5The definition of healthy

image

The definition of healthy

Ghar ka khaana brings us to the next point. Most Indians find it hard to diet because of the interpretation of the word healthy. For example, eating a huge meal of fried and processed food and then compensating by skipping the next meal is not considered healthy. Similarly, not every food prepared at home is healthy. Healthy food in the broadest sense refers to food that provides you with nutrition and energy at the cost of minimal ill effects. Therefore not everything prepared at home is necessarily healthy.

05/5Work life

image

Work life

India does not boast of a comfortable work-life balance. Having to work overtime or six or even seven days a week not only leaves no time for a proper diet, but it also strips you of willpower. Long hours of strenuous work makes you exhausted and hungry, which most people choose to curb with unhealthy food.

Even though we all understand the importance and implications of a healthy diet, it is something that always evades us. Junk food seems to trigger our pleasure centers in a way that fruits and veggies cannot, and because of that it becomes increasingly difficult to resist the urge to indulge in a burger or a… […]

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