The Main Cause Of Acne And Pimples : For Better Skin Give Up Dairy Products

A study found that milk, cream cheese, and cottage cheese were all associated with acne. Skim milk had a higher association with acne than whole milk, suggesting that the fat content of milk was not the contributing factor. Clinical trails have also confirmed that dairy products are the major triggering factor for acne as the hormones in milk overstimulate the human oil producing glands…If you want better skin drink soy milk, almond milk, or rice milk. Better still, stay off white and greasy and have vegetable juice in the morning…


for-better-skin-give-up-daiWhen I was young I was forced, like most children are, to drink two glasses of milk a day. My face was full of pimples. My husband drank milk when he was young but both he and his brother had acne as adolescents. My son has never drunk milk. He has never had a pimple. The International Dairy Board insists that acne is genetic. My son’s case will disprove that. Inversely people who have never had acne have children whose faces are covered with pimples and who have milk, cheese and curd regularly.
Teenage acne is a common skin disease that is associated with adolescents and young adults. Acne affects all ages, but its maximum prevalence peaks at 16-18 years when 75 per cent of this age group is affected, more commonly girls. There are over 2 million sites on the net with thousands of doctors and dermatological institutions who confirm that the main cause of these ugly pimples is milk. Let me tell you why. The principal cause of teenage acne is the increase in hormone production that occur during adolescence. This increase leads to overactivity of oil glands (sebum) in the upper layer of the skin and sweat glands. The pores become clogged with both sebum and dead skin cells creating a breeding ground for bacteria. These bacteria and the breakdown products of sebum cause irritation and inflammation in the pores. The result is acne blackheads, whiteheads, pustules, and cysts in the skin..
Research shows that the hormones in cow’s milk can also stimulate the same mechanisms. Nearly all milk sold by professional dairies all over the world is derived from pregnant cows. Cows are allowed to feed their calf for less than a month (in India, most of the calves are sent to slaughter in the first two weeks itself). The cow then goes back into the commercial milk production line. Six weeks later she is inseminated again and continues producing milk during her 10-month pregnancy, at which point the cycle is repeated. This process results in milk that contains progesterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) which her body is producing for her own fetus. DHT is the final molecule that turns on the oil making cells, in both men and women. Other hormones also stimulate acne. The most frequently implicated substance is IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor), which also increases during the teenage years. IGF-1 is present in all milk and increased in milk from cows treated with bovine growth hormone (rBGH).
A recent study by Harvard researchers called High School Dietary Dairy Intake and Teenage Acne reported in the Journal of the American Academyof Dermatology found an association between dairy intake among high school girls and acne. This study was done with more than 116,000 female nurses. They completed a questionnaire regarding their intake of dairy products (and other foods) during their high school years and a history of severe teenage acne. The study found that milk, cream cheese, and cottage cheese were all associated with acne. Skim milk had a higher association with acne than whole milk, suggesting that the fat content of milk was not the contributing factor. Contrary to popular belief, chocolate and French fries, were not linked to acne, though they are linked to body fat.
The researchers asked the women about their consumption of dairy food when they were teens, particularly about the type of milk they drank, and whether they had experienced severe teenage acne. The women who drank more than three servings of any type of milk per day (cheese or yoghurt) were 22 per cent more likely to have had more severe acne than those who drank only one serving per week. Those who consumed two or more glasses of skim milk daily were 44 per cent more likely to say that they had been diagnosed with severe acne as teenagers.Women who ate one or more servings of dairy foods like instant breakfast drinks, butter, cream cheese and cottage cheese as teenagers were up to 63 per cent more likely to say they had severe acne during their teen years.
Dr F.W. Danby, a well respected Canadian dermatologist has conducted 23 clinical trials on acne and has been teaching medical students about acne for 25 years as Chair of a division of dermatology, had written a paper for the prestigious medical journal Dermatology in February 2005 in which he confirms that dairy products are the major triggering factor for acne as the hormones in milk overstimulate the human oil producing glands.
”Drinking milk and consuming dairy products from pregnant cows exposes us to the hormones produced by the cows pregnancy, hormones that we were not designed to consume during our teenage and adult years. It is no secret that teenagers acne closely parallels hormonal activity.We found that intake of milk was associated with increased risk of teenage acne in girls. This finding suggests that the hormonal constituents of milk are present in sufficient quantities to have biologic effects in girls, and raises the possibility that other hormonally sensitive glands may also be affected. Because of the potential importance for acne and possibly breast cancer, these relationships should be evaluated further.” These two studies are not new. In the mid 1960s Dr. Jerome Fisher, a dermatologist in California, collected dietary histories on over 1000 acne patients. He found acne to be related to the amount of milk consumed and compared his patients to group of 5227 teenagers whose diets were studied in New York City. His acne patients consumed 50 to 300 per cent more milk than the teenagers in NewYork and their acne reflected this.
Other scientists, working in Wisconsin USA, Germany, and Scotland showed in the early 1970s that the milk of pregnant cows contains progesterone and other hormones and that human oil glands contained the enzymes that convert these hormones to DHT. So the chain of events that leads from the cow getting pregnant; being milked; getting pregnant for her second calf while she is still being milked; to you driniking /eating the milk, cream, ice cream, butter, cheese, yogurt etc; to the hormones being absorbed into your body, going to the oil gland receptors, converting to DHT and turning on the cellular activity that creates acne.
As the years went by, while clinical research in this field was very little, hundreds of dermatologists realised that there were thousands of patients whose acne improved when the dairy in their diet was eliminated. Yet another study done together by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover on Milk Consumption and Acne in Adolescent Girls, studied 6,094 girls, aged 9-15 years in 1996 to 1998. The highest acne was in those that had 2 or more servings a day, the lowest had one serving per week. The results did not change no matter what else the girls ate or used. “We found a positive association between intake of milk and acne.” This finding supports earlier studies and suggests that the effects of milk are sufficient to elicit biological responses in consumers.
In another study, the researcher reported that among 1,925 patients who kept a food diary, the majority implicated milk in acne flares. It didn’t matter whether the milk was whole, low fat, or skim. University of Buffalo professor dermatologist Harvey Arbesman, M.D., says another problem is the iodine in milk.”It has been well-established since the 1960s that iodine intake can exacerbate acne,” says Arbesman. Many studies have shown there is a significant level of iodine in milk. “Farmers give their cows iodine-fortified feed to prevent infection,” he notes, “and they use sanitising iodine solutions on their cows’ udders and milking equipment. Consequently, there is lot of iodine in dairy products. The connection could be a combination of hormones and iodine.”
Our bodies are not meant to digest the milk from other animal species. You were intended to be weaned in the first year of your life. Milk from a pregnant cow is not a ‘natural’ food for a growing human – any more than milk from a pregnant human would be natural for a growing calf. If you want better skin drink soy milk, almond milk, or rice milk. Better still, stay off white and greasy and have vegetable juice in the morning.

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