New Leaders Mohamed Morsi

The possible effect of Morsi’s rule on the domestic policy of Egypt remains very vague as Egypt’s bureaucracy is filled with Hosni Mubarak loyalists and could pose a hindrance to decisions taken by Morsi. 

Mohamed Morsi is the fifth and current President of Egypt. He assumed office on 30 June this year. Previously he was a Member of Parliament in the People’s Assembly of Egypt from 2000 to 2005 and a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood. In 2011 when the Egyptian revolution began, the Muslim Brotherhood founded the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP). Morsi became the President of FJP. He stood as FJP’s candidate in the Presidential Elections held in May-June 2012. On 24 June 2012, the Election Commission of Egypt announced that Morsi had won the Presidential Elections against Ahmed Shafiq, the former Prime Minister from the Hosni Mubarak regime. According to the election results, Morsi bagged 51 per cent of the votes against Shafiq who claimed only 48 per cent. Morsi was born in Northern Egypt in Al Sharkia Governorate. He served as a member of the Egyptian Parliament representing Zagazig from 2000 to 2005. At that point of time he stood and won as an independent candidate because the Muslim Brotherhood was banned from contesting the elections under the direct order of the then President Hosni Mubarak. The Muslim Brotherhood’s first candidate for the Presidential Elections was Khairat El-Shater. But after he was disqualified from the elections, the second choice or the back-up candidate, Mohamed Morsi, was nominated by the Muslim Brotherhood as a candidate and in due time he emerged victorious. Morsi was officially announced the President of Egypt on 24 June 2012.

It has to be seen in the future how Mohamed Morsi, the new President, governs Egypt, especially after the turbulent revolution that took the country by storm recently. Everything has to be re-structured, right from the Constitution itself, and Morsi’s decisions are very important for maintaining the balance of power in the Middle-East.

 

During the elections Morsi tried to appeal to political liberals and the minorities as their sympathiser and portrayed his rival Ahmed Shafiq to be a Hosni Mubarak era ‘hold-over’. On 30 May 2012, Morsi filed a defamation lawsuit against Egyptian television presenter Tawfiq Okasha. According to the English language newspaper, Egypt Independent, which is a subsidiary of the Egyptian daily Al-Masry Al-Youm, Okasha criticised the Muslim Brotherhood as well as Morsi on air for 3 hours. According to Morsi, baseless accusations were made. Okasha has aired a video of the execution, allegedly by the Muslim Brotherhood, of a member of the Christian minority. The possible effect of Morsi’s rule on the domestic policy of Egypt remains very vague as Egypt’s bureaucracy is filled with Hosni Mubarak loyalists and could pose a hindrance to decisions taken by Morsi. In an interview aired on Egypt’s national television, Morsi stated that his concept for the government will be a mix of the Presidential and Parliamentary system, which would result in a comprehensive establishment of the legislature. His primary aim is to prepare and influence the new Constitution of Egypt in a manner which would protect civil rights and yet be enshrined in Islamic law.
It has to be seen in the future how Morsi governs Egypt, especially after the turbulent revolution that took the country by storm recently. Everything has to be re-structured, right from the Constitution itself, and Morsi’s decisions are very important for maintaining the balance of power in the Middle-East.

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